Pictures courtesy of LebanonUntravelled

Remains from at least 3,000 years of human occupation lie tangled among the myrtle and brambles of this 400 meter long and 120m wide peninsula. It is partially separated from the land by two great trenches-dug into the bedrock during the Crusader period.

While Enfeh has witnessed only minor excavation, Phoenician and Roman walls, wine presses, mosaic floors, and two seventh-century-A.D. chapels lie bare beneath the intense sun and wind. This lovely seaside fishing town is known for its ancient churches and caves. Today Enfeh is also known for its salt production.

llĀ anfeh

anfeh

anfeh

anfeh

The Enfeh peninsula was once a mighty fortress area, the Crusader castle of Nephin (enfeh), fief of the Counts of Tripoli.

The Crusader Lords of Nephin, triply safe behind the walls of Enfeh, the vast rock-cut moat which severed the peninsula from the town, and the sea-swept battlements of their citadel, soon established a reputation as robber barons, the terror of travellers between Jerusalem and Tripoli.

The town itself had a better reputation, for its wines were known and prized far and wide throughout the Latin kingdom in the 12th and 13th Centuries.

 

anfeh moat

anfeh moat

anfeh

Today’s village of Enfeh is built around the ruins of several short-lived cities going back to the Phoenician period. Natural dwelling caves abound on the surrounding hill of Al-Gheer; the original city lies on a small near-island about half a kilometer into the sea.

Its outstanding feature is that it is the only town throughout the eastern coast of the Mediterenean to be carved out of its rocky surroundings

anfeh

anfeh