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Jupiter Temple, Baalbeck

The Temple of Jupiter was a colossal temple dedicated to the cult of Zeus, located in Hekiopolis or Baalbeck. It was the main building in a huge “Great Court” (or “Sanctuary”) of a Roman pagan temple complex that still partially stands. The Temple of Jupiter in Heliopolis (in a complex area called even Sanctuary of Heliopolitan Zeus) presumably replaced an earlier Phoenician one that used the same foundation. Read more

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Bacchus Temple, Baalbeck

The Temple of Bacchus at Baalbeck, a World Heritage site, is one of the best preserved and grandest Roman temple ruins in the world. It and its ornamentation served as an influential model for Neoclassical architecture. The temple was commissioned by Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and designed by an unknown architect and built close to the courtyard in front of the larger temple of Jupiter-Baal. Read more

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Niha lower Temples, Niha

The remains are visible of two Roman temples, one of which has been restored. This faces to the north and it can be reached by going up three successive levels dominated by four columns with Corinthian capitals. One can see sculptures and bas-reliefs representing a high priest in drapery with three icons; on his head there is a “lebbadeh” surmounted by a crescent and in his hand a vase for pouring out holy water. Read more 

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Niha Higher temple, Niha

On the top of Mount Niha (el Hosn) one discovers a third Roman temple, like the others in the style of those at Baalbek. A little further on are quarries for stone going back to Roman times. Read more

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Qasr Naba Temple, Kasernaba

Qasr Naba is home to the second-widest Roman temple in Lebanon. Its features resemble those of the Great Temple in Niha, and it retains its huge stairways and foundations. Archeologists say what was uncovered is only the top level of the temple, the rest of which is believed to be buried under the entire village. Aside from the temple, you’ll be able to see al-Maqtaa, the stone quarry, where the Romans cut the stones they used for building the temple. Read more

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Temnin el Fawqa Temple, Temnin el Fawqa

Temnin el-Foka is a nymphaeum is close to the spring of Ain el Job. The nymphaeum is an arched watercourse built of large stones that has been constructed 4 metres (13 ft) deep into a hil. It leads to a cistern underground. A gulley has formed at the outflow, where a boundary pillar is carved with the image of a goddess. It resembles a similar cippus at Kafr Zabad. Read more

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Kfarmeshki  Temple, Kfarmeshki

In 1852 the village of Kfarmeshki was visited by an orientalist by the name of Edward Robinson. He later wrote about his visit, mentioning the existence of two Roman sarcophagi in the area. One may see the ruins of a Roman temple having connection with a group of sanctuaries on Mount Hermon. This temple, seventy feet by thirty, has suffered a great deal of damage, but from its position facing the splendid Mount Hermon, it offers a unique and unparalleled spectacle. Read more 

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Ain Harsha Temple, Ain Harsha

Ain Harsha Temple  dates from a Greek inscription on one of the blocks to 114-115 AD. The temple is built of limestone, opens to the east and blends in well with the landscape. The pediment and west wall are in particularly good condition and two columns bases show what supported the beams and roof. Carved blocks show busts of Selene, the moon goddess and Helios, the sun god. Around the site are remnants of ancient habitation and tombs. Read more

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Beka Temple, Beka

There are the ruins of a Roman Temple in the village that are included in a group of Temples of Mount Hermon. George Taylor classified it as a prostylos temple and noted that the north and south walls remained standing and the podium floor had survived. The site has been heavily damaged by local construction of houses over the site. The temple featured an underground crypt that was accessible via one of the houses that had been built over it.

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